Sleep Awareness Week – Seven Sleep Tips for Children

The National Sleep Foundation is celebrating its annual Sleep Awareness Week © March 6-13, 2016, to raise awareness for the health benefits of sleep and its importance to safety and productivity. Here are seven tips to help your little one get the healthy sleep they need. These are especially important as we get closer to Daylight Saving Time, which can interrupt their …

Baby Sleep Patterns: Short Naps

What is a short nap? When a child turns 16 weeks, their sleep needs are different than that of a newborn. Now, sleep can be scheduled and a regular bedtime routine should be well established. Figuring out your child’s sleep patterns is half the battle; the other half is coordinating them into a schedule. Many of my clients will tell …

Baby Sleep: Putting Baby Down for a Nap

Many people ask my advice on how they should go about getting their baby to nap. It is important to remember that the number of naps, the length of the nap and the timing at which they begin all need to be considered when trying to master a successful nap schedule for your little one. Let’s start with the 3 …

The Third Nap: 6-9 Months

When becoming a parent, educating yourself on standard sleep regressions and milestones is a great way to stay ahead of the curve. The sixth-month mark is often a struggle; many of my clients first reach out to me during this time. Figuring out the right amount of naps and when to establish bedtime can get tricky.   Here are some …

Child’s Sleep Wave – Perfect Timing Produces No Crying

Nailing down a consistent nap schedule is often half the battle during a sleep training process. Naps can take 2-6 weeks to solidify and until then, there will be “good” nap days and “bad” nap days, this is all within the realm of normal. The best thing we can do to get naps on the right track establishes the timing …

Needing Sleep: High Need Baby vs Special Needs Baby

When people hear the term “high need baby”, many automatically think “special needs baby” which can stir up a lot of emotion for parents. In reality, high need and special needs are very different and need to be addressed differently. According to pediatricians Drs. William and Martha Sears, the doctors who coined the term “high need baby”, it underscores the …